Feb 9, 2011

A Good Finish!

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I took the picture above just a few weeks after getting my new camera. It was my very first attempt to photograph horses and action. I was using a large zoom lens and a tripod, both for the first time too. Needless to say, I’m lucky I got any photos that were worth keeping and even the two or three that I kept were not all that great. I’d pick them apart in a heartbeat today.

But here’s the thing. In spite of all the flaws I can see, I still LOVE this photo. (And a similar photo that I posted on my photography blog a while back.) Why? Because the joy and adoration on this little girl’s face reminds me how unconditional love looks. The way I like to see it, this young lady doesn’t care if the horse she’s riding on won or lost, she’s just thrilled to be sitting up on his back. With all the fussing and perfecting we do with our horses we tend to lose touch with that attitude. So yeah, while the photographer in me wishes I’d known enough to pull back a bit and try to include both horses and not chop the legs off the subjects, the little girl in me doesn’t really care. I kept this picture because I smile every time I look at it. It helps me remember the unfiltered thrill of being up on a horse and not worrying about what’s going right or what’s going wrong, but just being where I want most in the whole wide world to be: on a horse!

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Dharla and I got out for a nice loop in the woods. She handled everything quite well (water crossing, mucky deep mud, etc.) and it was relaxing and quiet. Gosh, she has the makings of an awesome trail horse! Smart, observant, willing, super surefooted. We emptied out onto the AL trail by the viaduct, crossed, then looped around at BH and headed home. No real issues at the ledges, but when we got to the last “scary area” she was a bit spooky and amped. Now granted, this area is very close to home and I’m sure she knows exactly where she is in relation to home by now, but I decided to turn her around and walk her through the area several times before calling it a ride. That uncovered a bit of a sticky spot. We ended up passing through various parts of that outcrop about 15 or 20 times … at least until she was more compliant. I wouldn’t say she was totally relaxed, but at least she wasn’t spooking or refusing to go where asked. I don’t get the sense that this is truly a fear problem. Perhaps it was at first, on the first few passes. But after that I do sense that it’s a disrespect issue: she simply doesn’t want to go where I’m asking her to go. I’m sure that’s partly because she’s been afraid in that area, so we’ll just keep treating it as a fear issue and give her lots of time and exposure to help her understand that nothing’s going to happen to her in that spot.

I think it’s important to pick your battles. Because the rocky outcrops are always going to be a part of our rides, I don’t want to make a bigger deal out of them than necessary. I think if you do that you risk getting into an attitude loop where the horse starts to associate that location as “The Spot Where Shit Happens.” Unfortunately, due to the nature of their presence the ledges will always present some teaching moments that I don’t get a lot of choice about using. In other words, if I want to go anywhere then my horse is going to have to learn to cope with the ledges and the conditions they present. My goal is to get my horse to walk through these areas with me no matter what we encounter there.

Some seasons that means there will be puddles or water on the trail at the base of the rock ledges. Other seasons (like now) that water will turn into ice and scary icicles. Because water almost always weeps from the face of the ledge, on some days the sun reflects off the wetness and makes them appear quite shiny. On other days our shadow appears on rocks as we pass by them. Again, this all depends upon the sun, it’s location and the time of day that we’re riding. I can’t ride “around” these issues and Dharla must learn to cope with them as they crop up. Because these things occur naturally, I can’t pre-arrange a specific event for us to practice. Instead, I’ll just have to grab these teaching moments on the fly.

I had the same problem when we first brought Dharla home last April and we started trail riding. Dharla had the typical Arabian aversion to water. ANY kind of water. A small puddle, a two-inch wide trickle across a path or a bubbling book … it didn’t matter. Dharla was NOT going to get her feet anywhere near water. Unfortunately, there isn’t a single place I can ride around here that we won’t encounter water in some form. I will admit however, that I was not surprised by Dharla’s dislike of water; The Bean had been outrageously melodramatic about water in his youth. Good grief, he wouldn’t even approach a dark spot on the ground long after a puddle had dried up! So after having watched The Bean do everything but stand on his head to avoid touching water, I wasn’t all that fazed by Dharla’s apparent distaste for anything wet. While she wasn’t nearly as dramatic or emphatic as Beanie, she did do her best to put the kabbash on any water crossings.

All it took was patience and LOTS of practice. I’m sure somewhere there are horses that are just naturally made to be great trail horses; horses who seem to take everything they encounter in nature with stride. But I do think that’s the exception, not the norm. My horse has the makings of a great trail horse, but some things are going to take more work than others. That’s OK.

On another note. Friday (Feb 10) is the end of the first week that Dharla has been on a few new supplements. Can I say I see any difference? Yes, a little. I did feel that during our ride today those times when she did spook were not nearly as bombastic as they were prior. While Dharla isn’t a spook and run kind of horse, she can really dig deep when she spooks, sometimes dropping her head and shoulders to what almost feels like her knees or the ground, while scooting sideways several feet simultaneously. Kind of like what I’d imagine riding a cutting horse feels like. This is why I call her the “Bottle Rocket.” It’s quite a roller coaster ride! But on our last ride her spooks seemed less frequent and less animated, which is really all that I’m hoping to achieve for now. I’m not looking for a bomb-proof horse, I’d just like to see her level of reactivity come down a notch or two. That would greatly improve things for my back.

As for the supplement I’m giving her for her heat cycle … hm. I can’t say I know for sure yet. Heck, if I’m being really honest, I’m not even 100% sure what I’m looking for. I suspect when she goes into heat I’ll know. Less nasty antics with Bullet prior and less teasing/squirting when she’s in standing heat maybe? Time will tell. I will say that I’ve FINALLY succeeded in getting Dharla to eat the supplement pellets very well and it seems she’s now acquired a taste for the herbal liquid. Yay! Persistence and smaller doses paid off and I’m very glad not to be throwing my money down the tubes.

Snow coming in for the weekend …. I’ll keep my fingers crossed that it won’t put too much of a dent in our riding. But hey, it IS winter for crying out loud!  🙂

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2 thoughts on “Feb 9, 2011

    • Thanks! I’m glad the photo struck a chord with you too! It never fails to make me smile. It reconnects me with the little girl in me who still delights in being on any horse!

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